The Fayette Tribune, Oak Hill, W.Va.

Local News

November 12, 2012

This week in West Virginia history

The following events happened on these dates in West Virginia history.

Nov. 7, 1775: The historic Forks-of-Cheat Baptist Church was organized about six miles north of Morgantown. It is the oldest church with continuous records west of the Alleghenies in West Virginia. Each July, this small congregation flies the British flag to mark the church’s original Colonial status.

Nov. 8, 1936: “It’s Wheeling Steel,” a half-hour musical variety radio program, debuted over WWVA in Wheeling. The program was an instant success with local audiences.

Nov. 9, 1874: Matthew Mansfield Neely was born in Doddridge County. He was the 21st governor of West Virginia.

Nov. 9, 1952: The Huntington Museum of Art opened as the Huntington Galleries. The museum is located on more than 50 acres in the Park Hills section of Huntington.

Nov. 10, 1777: Cornstalk, his son Elinipsico, and the sub-chief Red Hawk were murdered in captivity by enraged whites who blamed them for the recent killing of two white men. Cornstalk, a Shawnee leader who lived in what is today southeastern Ohio, commanded Indian forces at the Battle of Point Pleasant.

Nov. 10, 1861: A Confederate cavalry force of more than 700 attacked a Union recruit camp for the Ninth (West) Virginia Infantry regiment at Guyandotte in Cabell County. Led by Col. John Clarkson, the Confederates quickly overcame the brief but spirited resistance of the federal recruits, who numbered slightly more than 100 men.

Nov. 10, 1978: The New River Gorge National River was established by Congress. It is one of only three national rivers administered by the National Park Service.

Nov. 10, 1979: The last home game was played at Old Mountaineer Field at West Virginia University. More than 38,000 people attended the game.

Nov. 11, 1929: The Memorial Arch was dedicated on Armistice Day in Huntington.  The Memorial Arch stands at the intersection of 11th Avenue and Memorial Boulevard in Huntington. The arch pays tribute to Cabell County soldiers who fought in World War I.

To read more about West Virginia’s people, places, history, arts, science and culture, go to “e-WV: The West Virginia Encyclopedia” at www.wvencyclopedia.org. Developed by the West Virginia Humanities Council, it is an interactive reference site showcasing West Virginia’s history, culture, and people. e-WV is free of charge and available to anyone with access to a computer and Internet connection.

For more information contact the West Virginia Humanities Council, 1310 Kanawha Blvd. E., Charleston, WV 25301, or at 304-346-8500.

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